Can Rabbits Eat Sprouts Leaves

This rule was created many years ago as a way to show that fresh food was needed at all in the diet. However, this amount is purely for survival and is not enough to provide a healthy diet. Vegetables are often given a bad reputation as a food for rabbits & guinea-pigs. People are often scared of feeding too much or feeding the wrong thing and there is a lot of misinformation and food myths out there. Hopefully, this will help to clear up some of the incorrect information floating around and simplify things.

Can Rabbits Eat Sprouts Leaves
Can Rabbits Eat Sprouts Leaves

These are higher in fibre, which is an essential part of your furry friend’s diet. However you shouldn’t feed your rabbit Alfalfa hay as she gets older because the higher calcium content could lead to kidney and urinary problems. Alfalfa hay is the best kind for young rabbits up to seven months of age. This is because it’s high in calcium and protein that aid growth. In fact around 2% of UK households own one according to the Pet Food Manufacturers Association . Peppers – Good acceptance especially the white innards, rich in vitamin C with a high water content.

Can Rabbits Eat Sprouts Leaves
Can Rabbits Eat Sprouts Leaves

This is why feeding your rabbit correctly is so important. We have put together this general guide to ‘foods safe for dogs’ after thorough research. So, please consult your vet if you have any concerns and queries related to food safety and your pet.

The green stalk can occasionally be fed in a varied diet only in small amounts due to high amounts of solanine. Jerusalem Artichoke – All parts of the Jerusalem artichoke can be fed . It has a good acceptance overall and is a good concentrated healthy energy source with high fibre that strengthens the intestinal flora. Carrots – Carrots are another vegetable spurned due to the incorrect food myth that they are extremely high in sugar and should be fed in moderation. Carrots contain a balanced carbohydrate content of fructose, sucrose and glucose meaning that they are a good source of energy, because they supply sugar over a longer time period.

These rabbits should be placed onto a diet of grass and hayONLY.If concentrate food is offered, then it should be only in very small quantities. The ideal diet for a rabbit is high fibre (20-35%), low fat (1-3%), moderate protein (12-13%) with sufficient but not excessive calcium (0.5-1%). These requirements are met by a very cheap and ubiquitous food –GRASS! Rabbits cannot toleratehigh levels of carbohydrate – such as starches or sugars. Rabbits naturally eat throughout the day, and a good quality hay makes up the majority of their diet—about 80-90%.

Water is an essential part of your rabbit’s nutrition, and not drinking enough carries serious consequences. As well as being essential for their body to function, water flushes out excess calcium which can build up in rabbits, causing urinary stones and bladder problems. Rabbits kept in solitary confinement in a hutch that is too small are far from happy, and may become fearful and aggressive. Feed your rabbit small amounts of kiwi for a healthy treat. It is safe to feed your rabbit small amounts of parsley.

Can Rabbits Eat Sprouts Leaves
Can Rabbits Eat Sprouts Leaves

In an ad libitum varied diet, they will be selected as needed in the case of illness and are completely harmless in these small quantities. If you are unsure or cannot offer the ad libitum diet, do not feed. Tomato – Feed without green parts as they have a high solanine content. Green parts can be fed sometimes in small quantities in a varied diet such as the ad libitum diet. That’s what I got from the greengrocers the tree thing with lots of sprout top leaves on.

Can Rabbits Eat Sprouts Leaves
Can Rabbits Eat Sprouts Leaves

Love them or hate them, sprouts are safe for rabbits to eat – but only in very small amounts. They can cause gas to form in the stomach if too many are consumed. Good quality, fresh hay should be available at all times and, ideally, rabbits should have access to growing grass for grazing, or kiln-dried grass. Along with fresh water, hay is the most important part of a bunny’s diet. Any new foods should be introduced SLOWLY, a very small piece at a time to allow your rabbits sensitive digestion to adjust.