Proverb Suggesting That A Person Will Ascribe

This was a fleeting reference and comment made to me at a time when he knew and saw that I was busy. Dr Kelly and I normally sat down at the table in my office when he came to call. On this occasion my distinct recollection is of being behind my desk, totally preoccupied with the work I was doing, and of him standing in the doorway. A. I believe that this took place or rather I believe he spoke to me some time in late May. I believe it had to be subsequent to his conversations with Ms Watts, which I now know took place on 7th and 12th May.

Proverb Suggesting That A Person Will Ascribe
Proverb Suggesting That A Person Will Ascribe

However the ‘off your trolley’ expression is more likely derived from the meaning of trolley that was and is used to describe the overhead pick-up for an electric vehicle, including the ‘trolley wheel’, which connected the vehicle’s overhead booms to the power wires. The vehicle – commonly a bus or a tramcar – that was powered via this a trolley-wheel electric connection was called a trolley car, or streetcar or trolley bus. In this sense the word trolley related to the trolley-wheel assembly connecting the vehicle to the overhead power lines, not to the vehicle itself.

Proverb Suggesting That A Person Will Ascribe
Proverb Suggesting That A Person Will Ascribe

paraphernalia – personal belongings, or accessories, equipment associated with a trade or hobby – original meaning from Roman times described the possessions that a widow could claim from her husband’s estate beyond her share of land, property and financial assets. Derived from the Greek, ‘parapherne’ meaning ‘beyond dower’ (dower meaning a widow’s share of her husband’s estate). pansy – the flower of the violet family/effeminate man – originally from the French pensee (technically pensée) meaning a thought, from the verb penser, to think, based on association with the flower’s use for rememberance or souvenir. Pansy first came into English in the 1400s as pancy before evolving into its modern pansy form in the late 1500s, which was first recorded in English in 1597 according to Chambers.

Proverb Suggesting That A Person Will Ascribe
Proverb Suggesting That A Person Will Ascribe

There was no shortage of information whatever about the Poll Tax or its effect. The only problem we faced, was that we and – I use this in the inclusive sense – everybody faced, was that no one could persuade Margaret Thatcher that it was a bad idea. And there is no known cure to such situations, and certainly Freedom of Information does not have one, and I think that it is so important to hang on to that. I think there are two sides to the United States experience, and they need to be borne carefully in mind.

Proverb Suggesting That A Person Will Ascribe
Proverb Suggesting That A Person Will Ascribe

The percentage of people who will stop using an app after receiving push notifications is not a great deal smaller than those who simply disable app push notifications. 6% of users will abandon an app after receiving just one push notification per week – a figure that remained unchanged between 2015 and 2017. The better news is, outside of these hardcore push objectors, it seemingly is taking a greater number of push notifications to upset users to the point of uninstalling the app. CleverTap, for instance, identify a range of words that seemed to occur frequently in push notifications that result in strong engagement.

Mojo probably derives from African-American language, referring to a talisman or witchcraft charm, and is close to the word ‘mooch’, meaning witchcraft, used by the Gullah of the US South Carolina coast and islands. The word and the meaning were popularized by the 1956 blues song Got My Mojo Working, first made famous by Muddy Waters’ 1957 recording, and subsequently covered by just about all blues artists since then. mistletoe – white-berried plant associated with Christmas and kissing – the roots of mistletoe are found in the early Germanic, Sanskrit, Greek, Latin and Indo-European words referring either to dung and urine since the seeds of the mistletoe plant were known to be carried in the droppings of birds. The Old English word version of mistletoe first appeared about a thousand years ago when ‘tan’, meaning twig, from the Germanic origin taigas, was added to produce ‘mistitling’, which evolved by the 15th century into something close to the modern word.